Name

Rev. Thomas Hooker

Career

Public life

Occupation 1

Connecticut

Region

NA/New England region

Era

Europe's Reconnaissance (1351-1640)

Born

1586

Died

1647

Source

ANB

Text

Puritan minister, an architect of the New England Way, and a founder of Hartford, Connecticut�

On 4 September 1633 Hooker arrived in Boston on the Griffin along with John Cotton and Samuel Stone, his future assistant in the churches in Newtown and Hartford. Hooker and Stone proceeded directly to Newtown, where in the following month they led the foundation of a church on congregational principles�

Members of Hooker's Newtown congregation complained for several years about insufficient land for farming, and in 1635 they arranged to sell their holdings to a new group of immigrants preparatory to relocating on the Connecticut River. In May 1636 Hooker accompanied his congregation to their new settlement, named Hartford in honor of Samuel Stone's birthplace. Concurrent with the settlement of Hartford, people from Watertown and Dorchester also left Massachusetts in order to settle at Wethersfield and Windsor. These new settlements on the river were outside of the Massachusetts charter, but the river towns did not form a government of their own until 1638, delayed in part by the 1637 war with the Pequot Indians. When a general court met on 31 May 1638 to draw up the Fundamental Orders for a new government, Hooker addressed it with a sermon reminding the court that the choice of public magistrates belongs to the people and that those who have the power to appoint magistrates can also limit the power of the magistrates over them�

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Record ID: 562